Black Film

iluvsouthernafrica:

Angelina Jolie to Direct Movie Titled ‘Africa’.
The pic is based on the true story of paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey’s battle with ivory poachers, who threatened the existence of the African elephant population and the very soul of Africa. Jolie, David Ellison, Dana Goldberg and Jon Peters are producing.
“Based on Richard Leakey’s inspirational life, ‘Africa’ is a story that deserves to be told,” Ellison said. “It is very close to my heart, and I know that it will exceed my expectations in Angelina’s hands. She is an incredibly talented filmmaker and is sure to turn Eric Roth’s impeccable script into the project I’ve always wanted Skydance to be involved in.”
“I’ve felt a deep connection to Africa and its culture for much of my life, and was taken with Eric’s beautiful script about a man drawn into the violent conflict with elephant poachers who emerged with a deeper understanding of man’s footprint and a profound sense of responsibility for the world around him,” said Jolie.
(Continue reading)
*Always the animals before us.  First our basic livelihoods were demolished.  The same livelihoods which emphasized respect for our surroundings.  Europeans and Americans practiced unstoppable hunting as hobbies and ruined our countries leaving us poor and desperate.  Now they own the lands which their people huddle to looking for the “real African experience” and our landless people are then forced into the poaching industry.  In the end we are shown to be the aggressors.  Greedy, uneducated and unsympathetic to our animals.  Wake me up when there’s a film about Africans risking their lives to fight poachers.  Better yet, let’s make one and have it screened all over the African diaspora to counteract these white man saves Africa stories.
Fuck this shit.  

ugh View Larger

iluvsouthernafrica:

Angelina Jolie to Direct Movie Titled ‘Africa’.

The pic is based on the true story of paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey’s battle with ivory poachers, who threatened the existence of the African elephant population and the very soul of Africa. Jolie, David Ellison, Dana Goldberg and Jon Peters are producing.

“Based on Richard Leakey’s inspirational life, ‘Africa’ is a story that deserves to be told,” Ellison said. “It is very close to my heart, and I know that it will exceed my expectations in Angelina’s hands. She is an incredibly talented filmmaker and is sure to turn Eric Roth’s impeccable script into the project I’ve always wanted Skydance to be involved in.”

“I’ve felt a deep connection to Africa and its culture for much of my life, and was taken with Eric’s beautiful script about a man drawn into the violent conflict with elephant poachers who emerged with a deeper understanding of man’s footprint and a profound sense of responsibility for the world around him,” said Jolie.

(Continue reading)

*Always the animals before us.  First our basic livelihoods were demolished.  The same livelihoods which emphasized respect for our surroundings.  Europeans and Americans practiced unstoppable hunting as hobbies and ruined our countries leaving us poor and desperate.  Now they own the lands which their people huddle to looking for the “real African experience” and our landless people are then forced into the poaching industry.  In the end we are shown to be the aggressors.  Greedy, uneducated and unsympathetic to our animals.  Wake me up when there’s a film about Africans risking their lives to fight poachers.  Better yet, let’s make one and have it screened all over the African diaspora to counteract these white man saves Africa stories.

Fuck this shit.  

ugh


secondtimevirgin:

Soleil O (Med Hondo, 1967)

"We had our own civilization. We forged iron. We had our popular dances and songs. We were very good at sculpting wood and working iron, spinning cotton and wool, weaving and basketwork. Our commerce wasn’t just barter. We made gold and silver coins. We had pottery and cutlery. We made our own tools and domestic utensils, using brass, bronze, ivory, quartz and granite. We had our own literature. We had our legal terminology, our religion, our science and our teaching methods."

atane:

atane:

Poison Fire - A short film about the Niger Delta region in Nigeria.

Synopsis

The Niger Delta is an environmental disaster zone after fifty years of oil exploitation.   One and a half million tons of crude oil has been spilled into the creeks, farms and forests, the equivalent to 50 Exxon Valdez disasters, one per year. Natural gas contained in the crude oil is not being collected, but burnt off in gas flares, burning day and night for decades. The flaring produces as much greenhouse gases as 18 million cars and emits toxic and carcinogenic substances in the midst of densely populated areas. Corruption is rampant, the security situation is dire, people are dying.  But the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Firefollows a team of local activists as they gather “video testimonies” from communities on the impact of oils spills and gas flaring. We see creeks full of crude oil, devastated mangrove forests, wellheads that has been leaking gas and oil for months. We meet  people whose survival is acutely threatened by the loss of farmland, fishing and drinking water and the health hazards of gas flaring. 

We also meet meet with Jonah Gbemre, who took Shell to court over the gas flaring in his village and won a surprise victory in the court.

Ifie Lott travels to the Netherlands to attend Shell’s Annual General Meeting. She wants to ask a simple question:  Is Shell going to obey the court order and stop flaring?  There is a demonstration outside  the meeting hall. Shell’s CEO shows up for the photo op and shakes her hand, and she meets the MD of Shell-Nigeria, Basil Omiyi.  She asks him about the spills and the flaring. He patiently explains Shell’s policies and efforts for social development, but what he says is at odds with reality on the ground.

Back in the Delta, Ifie returns to the communties and shows the taped interview with Omiyo to the victims of the oil industry…

Shell ignored the federal high court ruling. The oil companies continue the illegal gas flaring. Shell has set its own “flares out” deadline to end of 2009. But they have kept saying “next year” for a decade, and in the Delta nobody believes them.

Meanwhile, the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Fire

I’m reblogging this because of a twitter chat dynamicafrica had about incidents where lack of access to clean water and/or sanitation has caused a health crisis for communities. I immediately thought of the Niger Delta.


ourafrica:

Idris Elba on set in Ghana for the screenplay adaptation of Beast of No Nation by Uzodinma Iweala.

Directed by Cary Fukunaga (same director for HBO’s True Detective and future director of “The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, And The Real Count of Monte Cristo”)

The story follows the journey of Agu, a young boy in an unnamed West African country who is recruited into a unit of guerrilla fighters as civil war engulfs his country. Not only must he face the harsh realities of the death of his father and disappearance of his mother and sister,he must also join a life of violence and brutality. Agu befriends a mute boy named Strika and together they face the crimes and hardships of war which includes violence,bloodshed and a very dangerous commander.

Other cast members include Award winning Ghanaian Actress Ama K. Abebrese, Grace Nortey and Opeyemi Fagbohungbe. The movie is set to be released in 2015

from http://www.enewsgh.com/enews/2014/06/04/first-photos-idris-elbas-movie-shoot-in-ghana/


dynamicafrica:

Producers of ‘Nairobi Half Life’ Release New Kenyan Drama ‘VEVE’.

Homegrown Kenyan political thriller ‘VEVE’ is an action-packed drama that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

Recently screened at this year’s Durban International Film Festival, where it had its world premiere, VEVE is the latest film from the producers of one of Kenya’s most talked about films Nairobi Half Life.

Set in the Kenyan town of Maua in the north of the country, VEVE is crime thriller that follows the lives of several characters as they find themselves navigating a world of political intrigue, revenge, love and ambitious aspirations for success, all centered around VEVE - a local term for the plant stimulant known more commonly as ‘khat’.

Directed by Simon Mukali and written by Natasha Likimani, the film stars a range of local actors including Emo Rugene as leading man ‘Kenzo’, Lowry Odhiambo as ‘Amos’, a shrewd businessman, and Lizz Njagah as ‘Esther’, Amos’ dissatisfied wife.

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b-sama:

A critical look into Mozambique’s past: Licínio Azevedo’s Virgin Margarida

In Frelimo’s (Mozambique’s party in power since independence) official story of its liberation struggle and its socialist project after independence, many aspects get silenced. One among these are the re-education centers to “purify” the “compromised” that had not yet adhered to the values of the “new man” that Frelimo intended to create. Alleged criminals, traitors, reactionaries, sex workers, alcoholics, vagrants, and religious fanatics were sent to camps in the countryside for an extended period of time, often without trial. The 20th New York African Film Festival at the Lincoln Center is featuring a film about Frelimo’s re-education centers, “Virgin Margarida” made by Licínio Azevedo (screening today at at 3:30 pm and on Monday, April 8, 8:30 pm). Licínio Azevedo is a veteran film maker, originally from Brazil, but has lived in Mozambique for a long time. We held a short Q&A, below, but first the trailer

(Source: africasacountry.com)