Black Film

dynamicafrica:

Lemi Ghariokwu: Afro Art Beat

"Wow! Goddamn!"… these are the two words Fela Anikulapo Kuti said when he first saw Nigerian artist Lemi Ghariokwu’s work.

Most renowned for the album covers and sleeves designs he made for the Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti, in this video interview the Nigerian artist and illustrator Lemi Ghariokwu talks about the beginning of his carreer, his meeting with Fela, and his recent works.

Find more about Lemi Ghariokwu’s work here : myspace.com/ghariokwulemi

Interview filmed at Art Arc Gallery, London
artarc-collective.com

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists


dhrupad:

Bush Mama (1979)

TC: Are you with me children? The Lord is in the closet! 1900, one hundred and five Negroes was lynched in the Republic of America and the cries still didn’t penetrate God’s closet where he is kept! Now are you with me? From the year 1900 to 1920, eighty-five—I don’t know the figure! Seventeen, eleven, sixty-eight, forty-six, I’m talking about three hundred and sixty-eight  Negroes was lynched and the cry still didn’t penetrate God’s closet! Now are you with me children? And from there to 1954, two thousand Negroes was lynched and the cry still didn’t penetrate God’s closet!

The rope—the rope was replaced by the electric chair, the electric chair by the gas chamber, and the gas chamber by the firing squads of the boulevards of America!


dynamicafrica:

Faith and race in Muslim America: Being Black and Muslim in the United States.

"Being black and Muslim in America often means that one has to figure out a way to simultaneously navigate two particularly stigmatised social identities: that of being black and that of being Muslim. And when the dominant narrative of Islam in America is that it is primarily a Middle Eastern phenomenon or a South Asian phenomenon, then it does not leave a lot of space for people like me…where do their stories fit in?" - Donna Austin.

Watch this interesting and eye-opening conversation that deals with anti-black sentiment within the American Muslim community that is constructed through a view of Arab superiority, further aided by the systemic racism - both presently and historically - in the United States.

Seeing as the conversation is centered around being both black and Muslim, it’s unfortunate that much was not said about the experiences of black African Muslims in America.


soulbrotherv2:

Banished 
Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). 
Banished raises the larger questions — will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them? Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events. 
The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present. [film link] 

i watched this documentary not too long ago as i sat in a friend’s home in Atlanta, not too far from Forsythe County. very interesting and saddening indeed. a much watch - especially for those living in the south. this has happened in more small southern towns than most care to mention.  View Larger

soulbrotherv2:

Banished 

Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). 

Banished raises the larger questions — will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them? Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events.

The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present. [film link]

i watched this documentary not too long ago as i sat in a friend’s home in Atlanta, not too far from Forsythe County. very interesting and saddening indeed. a much watch - especially for those living in the south. this has happened in more small southern towns than most care to mention. 


postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas
American Violet  (2008)
Brick Lane (2008)
Desert Flower (2009)
Dreams of Life (2011)
Heaven on Earth (2008)
I Will Follow (2011) 
Skin (2008)
The Patience Stone (2013)
Things Never Said (2013)
Yasmin (2004)
Women of Color in Friendship/Family films
Arranged (2007)
Chutney Popcorn (1999)
Eve’s Bayou (1997)
How the Garcia Girls Spent Their Summer (2005)
Radiance (1998)
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
The Sapphires (2011) 
Tortilla Soup (2001)
Waiting to Exhale (1995)
What’s Cooking? (2000)
Women of Color in RomComs
It’s a Wonderful Afterlife(2010)
Miss Dial (2013)
Young Girls of Color
Akeelah and the Bee (2006)
Anita and Me (2002)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)
Life, Above All (2010)
Linda Linda Linda
Rabbit Proof Fence (2002)
Wadjda (2012)
Whale Rider (2002)
Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl (1998)
Yelling to the Sky (2011)
Queer Women of Color
Pariah (2011)
I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Saving Face (2004)
Spider Lilies (2007)
The Journey (2004)
The Peculiar Kind s1 & s2 (web series) 
Yes or No 1 & 2


important

postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas

Women of Color in Friendship/Family films

Women of Color in RomComs

Young Girls of Color

Queer Women of Color

important

(Source: napsnotesandknots)


dynamicafrica:

Filmmaker Chinonye Chuckwu’s releases trailer for powerful new film ‘A Long Walk’.

"A father humiliates his son by parading him through the neighborhood in women’s clothing in front of all the other kids on a summer day. The impact of that decision ripples through his family and best friend’s lives for years to come.

This story is based on true events.”

These events are based on the real life story of writer Samuel Autman whose manuscript-in-the-works, Sanctified: A Memoir detailed the following:

When I was ten years old in the summer of 1977, I was standing outside in St. Louis playing Nerf football in the streets with other neighborhood boys when we heard the loud thud of a door slam.

Our game stopped. We all looked up to see Steve, a kid who was eight or nine years old, being pulled by the arm, out of the house by his father.

Steve’s dad had caught him applying makeup and lipstick on his face. Too punish him, paraded Steve through the neighborhood wearing an oversized dress, high heels, a turban and a carrying a gigantic purse. His dad followed him with a belt dangling from his fist.

"You want to be a f******* girl?" His father screamed. "I’ll make you a f******* girl!"

“I’m sorry daddy, I won’t do it again. Please don’t make me do this,” the boy begged.

His father ignored those pleas. For the next fifteen minutes, he dragged Steve around our big city block as neighborhood kids teased and mocked him. Never had I send anything more humiliating. Although I cringed, I was among the hecklers — not my greatest childhood moment.

Steve would have had reason to feel betrayed by because when the other boys weren’t around, we talked about TV shows starring women like Get Christie Love, Electra Woman and Dyna Girl, and Wonder Woman, to name a few.

As we all followed them around the block, it became less. His tears mixed with makeup and lipstick stained the dress.

'A Long Walk' has so far been screened at the Cleveland International Film Festival, Athens International FIlm and Video Festival and the Florida Film Festival.

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naijaboi:

film looks at the roots of drum & west african music konkombe in nigeria.  off course you have the yoruba & hausa present.  what i loved is it showed female musicians the lijadu sisters (yoruba) and then  showed a igbo female transgender musician in aba in eastern nigeria.  not sure if skata is just a female entertainer or lives as a womyn full time.  the clip is here to bring warmth to ya. film is political, informative, entertaining, good production values. loved this film, reminded me of home & needed a smile today. check out my description below of the entire film.

http://youtu.be/kUEpyT0fnv0

Konkombe: The Nigerian Pop Music Scene

1980 TRT 60 minutes

This video documents the extraordinary breadth of the Nigerian music scene during the 1970s. From ethereal juju rhythms to the shattering funk of Afrobeat tunes, explore the wide spectrum of Nigerian pop music in this documentary. A country in transition, Nigeria’s music reflects this. This film explores the politics of the country also.  Looking at classism, sexism, colonialism, war, liberation movements, corruption & gender expressions.  Through showcasing the country, the people who make the music we explore the growth of a music and a nation.  The film highlights street musicians, a blind traditional minstrel, bandleader King Sunny Ade, composer I.K. Dario and the provocative Fela Kuti. In his powerful interview, the internationally renowned Kuti explains how he fuses socially commentary with African beats to create uniquely Nigerian music. One of the originators of the juju sound, I.K. Dairo, is also featured in a look at his pioneering work in both African music and worship. There’s an interesting peek into the recording studio with the Lijadu Sisters as they work on tracks for their album. The twins give the perspective of female artists in the music business, and they talk about the hardships of working for the British-owned Decca record label.  Shows musicians from Eastern Nigeria performing Highlife to traditional musicians.  Has an Igbo female transgender griot from Aba.  Shows music in the North with Hausa musicians.


neoafrican:

Auntie by Lisa Harewood (Barbados)

AUNTIE is a middle-aged seamstress and respected caregiver in her rural Barbadian community. Raising children whose parents are unwilling or unable, Auntie instils discipline, traditional values and a strong moral code. Twelve-year-old KERA is her latest ward and a special child to whom she has grown uncharacteristically close. Seven years after Kera’s mother emigrates to England in search of a better life, Auntie is confronted with the day she has long dreaded when the plane ticket arrives that will reunite Kera with her mother. Unable to accept the inevitable, Auntie makes a hasty decision that goes against everything she claims to stand for and risks damaging the special bond between them on the eve of the child’s departure. - See more at: http://arcthemagazine.com/arc/2014/03/auntie-a-short-film-by-lisa-harewood-to-be-screened-in-london/#sthash.d7vc8uwP.dpuf


knowledgeequalsblackpower:

lawickedbitch:

The Loving Family. 

Richard and Mildred Loving in 1965.

This beautiful couple was responsible for the breaking of the interracial marriage laws back in the day. I guess you could say that adversity was their middle name. When the state of Virginia denied them the right to tie the knot as well as 15 other states,they finally sealed the deal in Washington D.C and upon their return to their hometown,they faced arrest for their unlawful union and disgraced by the public eye. 

Mildred described herself not to be a political person ,but took her case to the United States Supreme Court in Washington ,getting the full attention of then Attorney General Robert F .Kennedy and the world.The rest is history, but what a way to make it. 

The images above were taken by Grey Villet for a full cover story  for the New York Times.When looking at them I can only think of one word: hope.

A documentary about the Loving family (The Loving Story) by filmmaker Nancy Buirski will be out by February 14. 

The documentary is currently streaming on Netflix.
It has great archival footage.